I'm Amber and I'm from Ireland. This is a blog mostly about physics but with some other interesting things thrown in. So if you have an interest (as I do) in astrophysics, particle physics, theoretical physics, mathematics, technology and other science related topics, then I invite you to follow my blog.

 

BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL NYE THE SCIENCE GUY

(Source: commie-pinko-liberal)

propergoodlike:

look at this shit eating grin. this man thinks he has posed an unanswerable question to evolutionary biologists that will shake the very foundation of the theory of evolution to its core when any 14-year-old can tell you that we literally did not evolve from monkeys. amazing

propergoodlike:

look at this shit eating grin. this man thinks he has posed an unanswerable question to evolutionary biologists that will shake the very foundation of the theory of evolution to its core when any 14-year-old can tell you that we literally did not evolve from monkeys. amazing

There are trees older than you think Earth is.

Bill Nye to creationist Ken Ham (via tiberiusmulder)

(Source: communified)

skeptv:

The Sound of Atoms Bonding

Featuring Professor Philip Moriarty

Some notes from discussion with Prof Moriarty
1. At 5:45, that Silicon cantilevers can be used to see atoms as long as the oscillation amplitude is high. See Sugimoto et al. Nature 446 64 (2007)
2. Terrible guitar playing chose by Brady against Phil’s wishes - see our gold ratio song at http://youtu.be/nBgQPSUTWVM featuring Phil’s work!

Nottingham Nanoscience group’s papers as PDFs: http://bit.ly/NottinghamNano
Selected key papers in the field:
https://www.sciencemag.org/content/325/5944/1110 [IBM Zurich]
https://www.sciencemag.org/content/336/6080/444.full [Franz Giessibl]
http://newscenter.lbl.gov/news-releases/2013/05/30/atom-by-atom/

The smallest magnetic byte Sixty Symbols video about IBM Almaden’s work: http://youtu.be/M0PY-vgLHCQ
Atomic switch video mentioned by Phil: http://youtu.be/UBmBMmuUBMk

This project features scientists from The University of Nottingham https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/physics/index.aspx
Sixty Symbols videos by Brady Haran

via Sixty Symbols.
website at http://www.sixtysymbols.com/
Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/sixtysymbols
Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/periodicvideos

anndruyan:

This is an excerpt from the documentary Our Spirits Don’t Speak English, where boarding school survivors are interviewed about their time in the schooling system.

Too many people don’t know about this. This, if anything, should be taught in schools, but instead it is hidden. In my elementary and middle school days we learned about the wild West, the railroad system, the California Missions, Pilgrims etc. The only Native education the U.S. implements in the curricula is the Trail of Tears. No one in my classes knew about Wounded Knee, the Long Walk, the broken treaties, the slavery of my own tribe to build churches, the bounties that were put on all Native heads (common bounty in CA was $1 for head $.50 for an ear), the cultural genocide.

If there is one Native thing this country needs to learn is the boarding school system. Some of us still live with the results of the boarding schools. We have high rates of domestic violence which is always stated as being introduced the schools. Native children were taken from their homes, and placed into the schools where they were beaten and molested by the teachers and staff. The schools were to reform Natives into respectable white people, but once the kids left the system they had trouble finding work, while some were outcast from their tribe.

This was all a part of the genocide, yet too many people have no idea this even happened.

How to measure the size of atoms and molecules - in your kitchen!

procyonsuniverse:

Atoms are small. Really small. One million of them in a row could safely hide behind a human hair; ten million could fit between the ridges on a postage stamp. If an apple were magnified to the size of the Earth, its atoms would be the size of that original apple. There are more atoms in a grain…

Mathematics is capable of an artistic excellence as great as that of any music, perhaps greater.

Bertrand Russell (via oh-thethinksyoucanthink)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

As young stars form, they often produce narrow high-speed jets from their poles. By astronomical standards, these fountains are dense, narrowly collimated, and quickly changing. The jets have been measured at velocities greater than 200 km/s and Mach numbers as high as 20. The animation above (which you should watch in its full and glorious resolution here) is a numerical simulation of a protostellar jet. Every few decades the source star releases a new pulse, which expands, cools, and becomes unstable as it travels away from the star. Models like these, combined with observations from telescopes like Hubble, help astronomers unravel how and why these jets form. (Image credit: J. Stone and M. Norman)ETA: As it happens, the APOD today is also about protostellar jets, so check that out for an image of the real thing. Thanks, jshoer!

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

As young stars form, they often produce narrow high-speed jets from their poles. By astronomical standards, these fountains are dense, narrowly collimated, and quickly changing. The jets have been measured at velocities greater than 200 km/s and Mach numbers as high as 20. The animation above (which you should watch in its full and glorious resolution here) is a numerical simulation of a protostellar jet. Every few decades the source star releases a new pulse, which expands, cools, and becomes unstable as it travels away from the star. Models like these, combined with observations from telescopes like Hubble, help astronomers unravel how and why these jets form. (Image credit: J. Stone and M. Norman)

ETA: As it happens, the APOD today is also about protostellar jets, so check that out for an image of the real thing. Thanks, jshoer!

skunkbear:

Tomorrow (Saturday) is the birthday of Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev - the man whose ground-breaking work led to the creation of the modern periodic table of elements.

Here’s a fun look at his contributions from Lou Serico and TED-Ed:

bobbycaputo:

Andri Pol takes a look inside CERN’s Swiss headquarters

Since being established in 1952, CERN (european organization for nuclear research) has been an internationally recognized center charged with the considerable task of exploring and understanding the fundamental structure of our universe. located near Geneva, close to the Franco-Swiss border, a team of over 2,500 physicists, engineers and researchers utilize some of the most complex and vast instruments on earth, studying the particles of matter which make up the world around us. the 2,512 members of on-site staff include 1,021 engineers and scientists, 883 technicians, 397 administrators and office staff, 132 craftspeople and 79 research physicists.

(Continue Reading)

charitys-history:

Rosalind Franklin
Born in London in 1920 to well-to-do parents, Rosalind attended a private girls’ school in her youth and then went on to Newnham College, Cambridge. In 1941 she was awarded Second Class Honors in her Finals. This was accepted as a bachelor’s degree in the qualifications for employment, since Cambridge did not offer official degrees to women until 1947. Franklin was awarded a research fellowship, but did not do well and left after a year to work at the British Coal Utilization Research Association. Her work there was the basis for her PhD thesis, and she was awarded her PhD in 1945 from Cambridge.
Franklin spent three years in Paris at the Laboratoire Central des Services Chimiques de L’Etat where she worked under Jacques Mering and learned the technique of applying X-ray crystallography to amorphous substances. She returned to England in 1951 as a research associate to King’s College, London.
When Franklin came to the lab, she was given responsibility for Maurice Wilkins’ DNA project, since Wilkins was away and no one had worked on it for months. When Wilkins returned, he thought Franklin had been appointed as his assistant, which led to a bad working relationship between the two of them.
“Working with a student, Raymond Gosling, Franklin was able to get two sets of high-resolution photos of crystallized DNA fibers. She used two different fibers of DNA, one more highly hydrated than the other. From this she deduced the basic dimensions of DNA strands, and that the phosphates were on the outside of what was probably a helical structure.” (http://www.dnaftb.org/19/bio-3.html)
James Watson and Francis Crick were working to solve DNA’s structure at this same time. Franklin did not know Watson and Crick very well, although Maurice Wilkins did, and had collaborated with them. Reportedly, Wilkins showed Watson and Crick Franklin’s X-ray data which confirmed the structure they had theorized and supposedly led directly to the solution of DNA structure. Both Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins published papers on their X-ray data in the same Nature issue with Watson and Crick’s paper on the structure of DNA.
Franklin left Cambridge in 1953 to work at Birkbeck College on the tobacco mosaic virus and the polio virus. She died in 1958 of Ovarian cancer.
In 1962, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins for solving the structure of DNA. Although the debate continues about the amount of credit due to Franklin for contributing to their discovery, the Nobel committee does not give posthumous prizes so she would not have received a Nobel Prize in any case.

charitys-history:

Rosalind Franklin

Born in London in 1920 to well-to-do parents, Rosalind attended a private girls’ school in her youth and then went on to Newnham College, Cambridge. In 1941 she was awarded Second Class Honors in her Finals. This was accepted as a bachelor’s degree in the qualifications for employment, since Cambridge did not offer official degrees to women until 1947. Franklin was awarded a research fellowship, but did not do well and left after a year to work at the British Coal Utilization Research Association. Her work there was the basis for her PhD thesis, and she was awarded her PhD in 1945 from Cambridge.

Franklin spent three years in Paris at the Laboratoire Central des Services Chimiques de L’Etat where she worked under Jacques Mering and learned the technique of applying X-ray crystallography to amorphous substances. She returned to England in 1951 as a research associate to King’s College, London.

When Franklin came to the lab, she was given responsibility for Maurice Wilkins’ DNA project, since Wilkins was away and no one had worked on it for months. When Wilkins returned, he thought Franklin had been appointed as his assistant, which led to a bad working relationship between the two of them.

“Working with a student, Raymond Gosling, Franklin was able to get two sets of high-resolution photos of crystallized DNA fibers. She used two different fibers of DNA, one more highly hydrated than the other. From this she deduced the basic dimensions of DNA strands, and that the phosphates were on the outside of what was probably a helical structure.” (http://www.dnaftb.org/19/bio-3.html)

James Watson and Francis Crick were working to solve DNA’s structure at this same time. Franklin did not know Watson and Crick very well, although Maurice Wilkins did, and had collaborated with them. Reportedly, Wilkins showed Watson and Crick Franklin’s X-ray data which confirmed the structure they had theorized and supposedly led directly to the solution of DNA structure. Both Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins published papers on their X-ray data in the same Nature issue with Watson and Crick’s paper on the structure of DNA.

Franklin left Cambridge in 1953 to work at Birkbeck College on the tobacco mosaic virus and the polio virus. She died in 1958 of Ovarian cancer.

In 1962, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins for solving the structure of DNA. Although the debate continues about the amount of credit due to Franklin for contributing to their discovery, the Nobel committee does not give posthumous prizes so she would not have received a Nobel Prize in any case.